WHAT EMPLOYERS WANT: What EVERY company wants in a new hire, part 4

WHAT EMPLOYERS WANT: What EVERY company wants in a new hire, part 4

What more could employers ask for? This week, we’ll look at another must-have for career-seekers who want to ensure that the job offers come their way.

  • EMPLOYERS WANT PEOPLE WHO CAN MAXIMIZE WHAT IS AVAILABLE TO THEM.

It should not be surprising that resources have limits. Supplies run out of stock, equipment and other fixed assets age and gradually lose function, gadgets and other devices become obsolete, and people age and lose the sharpness of their skills and abilities.

In the face of such limitations, we usually anticipate and endure struggles as we pursue our goals. That is a valuable skill, because it enables us to keep our balance and move forward. However, this method of dealing with limited resources is only centered on survival. It only aims to prevent further damage and does not provide game-changing opportunities. Because of that, companies seldom hire candidates who are merely skilled at enduring the challenges posed by limited resources.

In the same way that an exam is not about achieving the lowest acceptable score, resourcefulness is not about merely surviving on minimal resources. True resourcefulness enables people to achieve results that exceed what would normally be possible with the limited resources at hand. Candidates who have this skill – the ability to convert the disadvantages of limited resources into new opportunities – are very valuable to employers.

Why do employers prefer such prospect hires? Imagine a situation where two employees are both forced to accomplish the same task with the same number of limited resources. One employee manages to produce an “OK” output, not excellent but still acceptable. The other employee puts together something unique, brilliant and of high quality while still fulfilling the requirements of the task. In this case, who made better use of the resources available? We all would say that the second employee was the more efficient and capable worker.

From that hypothetical situation, we clearly see that resourcefulness – the ability to overcome resource limitations to produce the best outcome – is an advantage that can get career-seekers the attention they want. So if you’re good at improvising alternative ways to get what you need for your task, then you already have the edge over most other candidates. The company’s investment in you will be justified when you perform consistently and exceed expectations no matter what resources are available.

Do you have what it takes to push resources to their ultimate potential? If yes, then that’s another point towards your employability score.

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